<body><script type="text/javascript"> function setAttributeOnload(object, attribute, val) { if(window.addEventListener) { window.addEventListener('load', function(){ object[attribute] = val; }, false); } else { window.attachEvent('onload', function(){ object[attribute] = val; }); } } </script> <div id="navbar-iframe-container"></div> <script type="text/javascript" src="https://apis.google.com/js/plusone.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript"> gapi.load("gapi.iframes:gapi.iframes.style.bubble", function() { if (gapi.iframes && gapi.iframes.getContext) { gapi.iframes.getContext().openChild({ url: 'https://www.blogger.com/navbar.g?targetBlogID\x3d14136710\x26blogName\x3dCoreyoria+World+Tour\x26publishMode\x3dPUBLISH_MODE_BLOGSPOT\x26navbarType\x3dSILVER\x26layoutType\x3dCLASSIC\x26searchRoot\x3dhttp://coreyoriaworld.blogspot.com/search\x26blogLocale\x3den_US\x26v\x3d2\x26homepageUrl\x3dhttp://coreyoriaworld.blogspot.com/\x26vt\x3d-4527066864579660442', where: document.getElementById("navbar-iframe-container"), id: "navbar-iframe" }); } }); </script>

Coreyoria World Tour

“All journeys have secret destinations of which the traveler is unaware.”

Whoa. Whoa.

To say the least, it's been a very intense last few days here on Kibbutz Ketura. I'm feeling very torn about leaving, even though most of my friends here have already packed up and shipped out themselves. Still, I find my self increasingly attached to this sun-baked piece of desert and to the memories I have made with the people I'll miss.

Friday was my final day cleaning hotel rooms. It was quite the last day, too. On one hand I received my first and last tip for cleaning rooms. 20 shekels! Woot. On the other hand, it was from the most obnoxious tour group we've ever had. They were Canadians and not Americans, thank G-D, but whats the diff - they were those stereotypical Japs in the worst sense of the word. Horrid little things that were completely spoiled and walked around like they were better than everyone else. So I'm cleaning the kitchen in these little apartment like units at the hotel, washing the dishes, changing the trash bags ... clanging around a bit in the kitchen. There are four rooms attached and from one of the rooms I hear, "Whoever is in the kitchen needs to shut up!" Being the only one in the kitchen, I kind of shrugged and continued on. But then again, "Whoever is in the kitchen needs to shut up!" Still, I ignored and went about my business. However, when I heard, "Seriously, whoever is in the kitchen needs to shut the fuck up!" - well, I had had enough. So I opened the door and said, "Excuse me?" There were like 10 girls in the room having a sleepover and boy were they shocked when they saw me. One of the girls whispered, "It's someone from the kibbutz ..." Ha. "Oh my G-D, we're sorry. We're so sorry." "Yeah," I said, "I'm just trying to help you guys out by cleaning up. I'm sorry if it's a bit noisy, but I'm just doing my job." Then I got apologized to and thanked over and over again. It was okay though, because the tips evened things out. Even so, what a last day!

Friday night all of the volunteers went to a neighboring kibbutz and danced the night away and last night there was a good-bye party for a few of us girls that are leaving. There was wine and chardonnay so I can't complain. Then last night there was a world beat musical performance and I walked away with a free CD from the band so no complaints there. Also, a guy from the beginning of my time here came back to visit and we rode the infamous wheel of death (pictures will be posted in a short while and you'll be able to see it in all its glory).

This morning I awoke before sunrise to catch it rise over the Jordanin mountains. Martina, Sarah, and I climbed atop bales of hay to get the perfect shots. Hay is sharp and gives you splinters. I don't recommend climbing on it unless you're trying to capture the sun rising over Jordanian mountains or something equally spectacular. It wouldn't be worth it.

Oh, another thing I did was take a walk out to the "cow graveyard." Where they used to take the cows when they died. All that's left is bones now. It's a creepy site and you'd never know it was there unless someone else showed you, like many things in the desert.

Today lots of people left and we exchanged information and I was given a photo CD and I realized how much I am going to miss this place and the people and got all sad. It's a bittersweet feeling, but good things are coming my way so I'll smile as a wave good-bye.

Tomorrow holds in store a trip to the sand dunes and then I am going to Eilat with a friend of mine for drinks before getting to the airport at the hellish hour of 3am to start my trip back home. Okay, someone is waiting for the computer and I'm done hogging it.

Shalom,
Corey
« Home | Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »

» Post a Comment